The Truck of Doom: An Occasional Build Thread

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Re: The Truck of Doom: An Occasional Build Thread

Gary Lewis
Administrator
I second the what's-the-problem-with-four-vehicles question:

Technically the Subie is our daughter's, although she lives in Nicaragua and only uses it when she returns for a few weeks each year.

Janey has her GLK 250.

I have Blue for long-distance towing and taking lots of people and luggage to/from the airport, like we'll do tonight when the crew from Nicaragua comes in at midnight.

Currently Big Blue is running, but his much-awaited transformation is about to start.

Some year Dad's truck will be done

The '69 Bee is patiently waiting

The '50 Chevy is also waiting.

So, what's your dream project?
Gary, AKA "Gary fellow": Profile

Dad's: '81 F150 Ranger XLT 4x4: Down for restomod: Full-roller "stroked 351M" w/Trick Flow heads & intake, EEC-V SEFI/E4OD/3.50 gears w/Kevlar clutches
Blue: 2015 F150 Platinum 4x4 SuperCrew wearing Blue Jeans & sporting a 3.5L EB & Max Tow
Big Blue: 1985 F250HD 4x4: 460/ZF5/3.55's, D60 w/Ox locker in front & 10.25 Spicer/Trutrac in back, & EEC-V MAF/SEFI

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Re: The Truck of Doom: An Occasional Build Thread

Dorsai
In reply to this post by Dorsai
Dorsai wrote
I could probably start painting after dinner if I wanted to.
As it happened, I did want to.  The dehumidifier was a great idea - the floor was crispy and warm by about 7pm.  So I broke out the POR15 and gave both footwells and door channels a nice heavy coating, and then let it dry overnight.

This morning everything was dry.  The driver's side was just how I wanted it, but there were a couple of thin spots on the passenger side.  So I touched those up a little while ago, and while that's drying started laying the GTmat on the driver's side:



I probably should have bought more deadener than I did, but everything I've read says you only need about 30% coverage on a panel to get the benefit.  So I'm going to cover the footwells and transmission tunnel thoroughly, put the scraps down under the seat, and hope that plus the jute plus the new heavier-than-stock vinyl floor combines to give me a noticeable improvement in sound levels.  My only real goals in doing the floor are to stop rust and make the interior look better, so any noise reduction is gravy.
Matthew
1980 F-150 Custom 2wd longbed, 300-6, C6, 2.75 rear axle
Atlanta GA
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Re: The Truck of Doom: An Occasional Build Thread

Dorsai
In reply to this post by Gary Lewis
Gary Lewis wrote
I second the what's-the-problem-with-four-vehicles question:
Sure.  But, like Dave, you're a gentleman of refinement and understand these things.  Neither my wife nor my HOA share that understanding.

Now...if we end up retiring to Colorado (around 2035 or so) as I suspect we will (my wife is in charge of our retirement locale, and that's her current thinking), one of my non-negotiables will be that we have a place where I have room for a proper shop/garage along with the necessary number of vehicles to populate it.

So, what's your dream project?
It changes over time.  Originally, it was a 1958 Cadillac of some flavor:



Then I got attached to the 1949 Cadillac fastback/sedanette:



But then I realized that I needed to set my sights on something more affordable.  So my current (and most likely final) target is the '65 Impala:



A guy on the big Chevy forum I monitor did a beautiful build of a '65 Impala with an LS3-480 swap.  Something like that would be just about perfect for me.
Matthew
1980 F-150 Custom 2wd longbed, 300-6, C6, 2.75 rear axle
Atlanta GA
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Re: The Truck of Doom: An Occasional Build Thread

FuzzFace2
Dorsai wrote
Gary Lewis wrote
I second the what's-the-problem-with-four-vehicles question:
Sure.  But, like Dave, you're a gentleman of refinement and understand these things.  Neither my wife nor my HOA share that understanding.

Now...if we end up retiring to Colorado (around 2035 or so) as I suspect we will (my wife is in charge of our retirement locale, and that's her current thinking), one of my non-negotiables will be that we have a place where I have room for a proper shop/garage along with the necessary number of vehicles to populate it.

So, what's your dream project?
It changes over time.  Originally, it was a 1958 Cadillac of some flavor:



Then I got attached to the 1949 Cadillac fastback/sedanette:



But then I realized that I needed to set my sights on something more affordable.  So my current (and most likely final) target is the '65 Impala:



A guy on the big Chevy forum I monitor did a beautiful build of a '65 Impala with an LS3-480 swap.  Something like that would be just about perfect for me.
When the wife and I were looking to move and did moved in 2015, NO HOA and had to have room for or have a garage and land so I could park a trailer truck as that was the job I was looking for.

The more we looked I could see even having the room the garage would not get built. We were lucky to find a house we both liked, ranch so no steps as we are both 60, had the garage I wanted and land so I could park a trailer truck and the big one NO HOA!

Only thing that could have been better with the garage is if it was high enough for a lift inside and had heat & AC but after electrical & lighting upgrade and me piping my air compressor I am happy and was a big upgrade from a small 1 car garage and no land.

I always wanted a 59 Impala as mom & dad said that's what I came home in from the hospital and AC Cobra does not have to be the real deal and a 302 or 351 would be fine with a 5sp.
But need to finish my 70 AMC Javelin before I think of anything else to take on.

It's dreams that keeps us going
Dave ----
Dave G.
81 F100 flare side 300 six / AA OD / NP435 / 2.75 gear
http://cars.grantskingdom1.com/index.php/1980-Ford-F100?page=1
81 F100 style side 300 six/SROD parts truck -RIP
http://cars.grantskingdom1.com/index.php/1981-Ford-F100
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Re: The Truck of Doom: An Occasional Build Thread

Dorsai
In reply to this post by Dorsai
Dorsai wrote
I probably should have bought more deadener than I did, but everything I've read says you only need about 30% coverage on a panel to get the benefit.
Actually, I take this back...I think I bought the right amount:



The little bit of POR15 I put down this morning dried very quickly, so I was able to put the GTmat down on the rest of the cabin.  It looks pretty dopey, but I was able to get plenty of mat where I thought it most important (footwells and transmission hump), plus a good bit of coverage elsewhere.  If the objective is to load the floor and break up resonances, I think this will do the trick.

I may get the heat shield material down on the passenger floor tonight, but that'll be about it until Tuesday when I hope to get the jute in and start figuring out how to trim the vinyl.  Also, Tuesday is when the seat material arrives, so hopefully I can get the seat to the upholsterer before the end of the week.



One good thing about the floor drying so quickly is that I can move the truck again.  I don't have a milk crate, so I have to use my Homer bucket...I have a friend who is 7'2" (yes, he plays basketball, how did you guess?), and now I understand how he feels driving.

And now that I can move the truck:



Julia gets her parking space back.  I had originally told her she would most likely get it back on Monday, so she'll be pleasantly surprised when she gets back from today's shopping run.  Underpromise and overdeliver, that's a protip for you younger guys.
Matthew
1980 F-150 Custom 2wd longbed, 300-6, C6, 2.75 rear axle
Atlanta GA
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Re: The Truck of Doom: An Occasional Build Thread

ArdWrknTrk
Administrator
In reply to this post by Dorsai
The name for this roller is a brayer.

Just a tip to help you find one from a guy who worked in commercial art back in the days before computers changed everything.
 Jim,
Lil'Red is a '87 F250 HD, 4.10's, 1356 4x4, Zf-5, 3G, PMGR, Saginaw PS, desmogged with a Holley 80508 and Performer intake.
Too much other stuff to mention.
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Re: The Truck of Doom: An Occasional Build Thread

Gary Lewis
Administrator
In reply to this post by Dorsai
Matthew - I think you've done very well.  (I can't help but think of the immortal words of young Mr. Grace: "You've all done very well.")  You probably have 60% of the floor covered, and that's about twice the minimum.  And, you covered the unsupported areas that are the most likely to vibrate.

On top of that, you got done early.  Well done.    
Gary, AKA "Gary fellow": Profile

Dad's: '81 F150 Ranger XLT 4x4: Down for restomod: Full-roller "stroked 351M" w/Trick Flow heads & intake, EEC-V SEFI/E4OD/3.50 gears w/Kevlar clutches
Blue: 2015 F150 Platinum 4x4 SuperCrew wearing Blue Jeans & sporting a 3.5L EB & Max Tow
Big Blue: 1985 F250HD 4x4: 460/ZF5/3.55's, D60 w/Ox locker in front & 10.25 Spicer/Trutrac in back, & EEC-V MAF/SEFI

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Re: The Truck of Doom: An Occasional Build Thread

FuzzFace2
In reply to this post by Gary Lewis
You may want to put some mat on the back wall and pull the door panels and add some to the outer door skin as they both will be like big drums.
Dave ----
Dave G.
81 F100 flare side 300 six / AA OD / NP435 / 2.75 gear
http://cars.grantskingdom1.com/index.php/1980-Ford-F100?page=1
81 F100 style side 300 six/SROD parts truck -RIP
http://cars.grantskingdom1.com/index.php/1981-Ford-F100
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Re: The Truck of Doom: An Occasional Build Thread

Dorsai
This post was updated on .
In reply to this post by ArdWrknTrk
ArdWrknTrk wrote
The name for this roller is a brayer.
You da man.  Looks like this one is the one I'd want?  Now that I have a spare tailgate to play with, it's tempting to try my hand at automotive painting.

Gary Lewis wrote
You probably have 60% of the floor covered, and that's about twice the minimum.  And, you covered the unsupported areas that are the most likely to vibrate.
I'm hoping that's enough.  I don't listen to the radio (I'm pretty sure it only picks up the Green Country farm report anyway) in the truck, so it's not like noise reduction is a big deal.  But if I were to, say, drive the truck 900 miles west over a couple of days, a lot of noise could get tiring.

FuzzFace2 wrote
You may want to put some mat on the back wall and pull the door panels and add some to the outer door skin as they both will be like big drums.
I'm way ahead of you on part of that - I put mat in the doors a couple of years ago when I redid the door panels.  I could put some on the back wall I suppose, but that stuff is expensive, ugly, and would just let me more clearly hear my wife complain that her feet are hot.  Pass.

Speaking of which, didn't get the heat barrier down tonight; I forgot that Dominic and I had a scheduled viewing of Battlebots...it's robot fighting time!  Check back on Tuesday.
Matthew
1980 F-150 Custom 2wd longbed, 300-6, C6, 2.75 rear axle
Atlanta GA
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Re: The Truck of Doom: An Occasional Build Thread

ArdWrknTrk
Administrator
Dorsai wrote
ArdWrknTrk wrote
The name for this roller is a brayer.
You da man.  Looks like this one is the one I'd want?  Now that I have a spare tailgate to play with, it's tempting to try my hand at automotive painting.

Speaking of which, didn't get the heat barrier down tonight; I forgot that Dominic and I had a scheduled viewing of Battlebots...it's robot fighting time!  Check back on Tuesday.
Um... lol
A link to a transformers video????

Speedball is a common brand of both block and screen printing supplies.
Maybe something like this:   https://www.amazon.com/Speedball-Deluxe-Soft-Rubber-Brayer/dp/B003IFY622
 Jim,
Lil'Red is a '87 F250 HD, 4.10's, 1356 4x4, Zf-5, 3G, PMGR, Saginaw PS, desmogged with a Holley 80508 and Performer intake.
Too much other stuff to mention.
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Re: The Truck of Doom: An Occasional Build Thread

Dorsai
This post was updated on .
ArdWrknTrk wrote
Um... lol
A link to a transformers video????
Gah.  That's what I get for not verifying my links - that was a leftover quip regarding Gary's transformation of Big Blue.  I fixed it up above, thanks for letting me know.

Speedball is a common brand of both block and screen printing supplies.
Maybe something like this:   https://www.amazon.com/Speedball-Deluxe-Soft-Rubber-Brayer/dp/B003IFY622
What I intended to link to was this one: https://www.amazon.com/Speedball-4121-Deluxe-Rubber-Brayer/dp/B000BYVMFC/

Based on what Dave originally said, I was thinking the hard rubber would be the way to go...I can see the advantage of the firmness when trying to only paint the flat face of the letters.  But would the soft actually work better?  I have zero clue when it comes to paint and painting.
Matthew
1980 F-150 Custom 2wd longbed, 300-6, C6, 2.75 rear axle
Atlanta GA
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Re: The Truck of Doom: An Occasional Build Thread

ArdWrknTrk
Administrator
This post was updated on .
FuzzFace2 wrote
BTW this roller is a soft rubber type used to coat block set letters for printing.
I think they say it should be about 4" wide to cover a letter in 1 shot.
An 80 durometer roller is pretty hard and while it's good at linoleum block prints and for pressing together contact glued surfaces I think it might want to skid on steel when covered in OneShot.

The 40 durometer roller is used for inking more textured surfaces like weathered wood blocks for printing.
I thought it might work better in this application.
It's not soft like a sponge paint roller, and you don't have to use much pressure to get the ink onto your surface.

So, my admission is that I have never used a brayer in this way, but my intuition tells me that the 40 would work better with the slick sign lettering enamel.

You might go to a crafts store like Michaels or Joanne's and see if you can compare them side by side.
The best idea I can give you is that 80 is like belt leather wrapped around the wooden core while 40 is thicker crepe rubber like the sole of a hushpuppie shoe.
 Jim,
Lil'Red is a '87 F250 HD, 4.10's, 1356 4x4, Zf-5, 3G, PMGR, Saginaw PS, desmogged with a Holley 80508 and Performer intake.
Too much other stuff to mention.
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Re: The Truck of Doom: An Occasional Build Thread

Dorsai
ArdWrknTrk wrote
So, my admission is that I have never used a brayer in this way, but my intuition tells me that the 40 would work better with the slick sign lettering enamel.
It occurred to me this morning that I have robot wheels in different durometers.  They're not exactly like paint rollers, but after playing with them for a bit I suspect your intuition is correct; the 30 felt like it would do better than the 50, especially with paint on it.  The 80 would certainly be too hard.  I was initially worried that softer rubber would squish down over the edges of the raised lettering, but now I don't think it will.  
Matthew
1980 F-150 Custom 2wd longbed, 300-6, C6, 2.75 rear axle
Atlanta GA
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Re: The Truck of Doom: An Occasional Build Thread

FuzzFace2
In reply to this post by ArdWrknTrk
ArdWrknTrk wrote
FuzzFace2 wrote
BTW this roller is a soft rubber type used to coat block set letters for printing.
I think they say it should be about 4" wide to cover a letter in 1 shot.
An 80 durometer roller is pretty hard and while it's good at linoleum block prints and for pressing together contact glued surfaces I think it might want to skid on steel when covered in OneShot.

The 40 durometer roller is used for inking more textured surfaces like weathered wood blocks for printing.
I thought it might work better in this application.
It's not soft like a sponge paint roller, and you don't have to use much pressure to get the ink onto your surface.

So, my admission is that I have never used a brayer in this way, but my intuition tells me that the 40 would work better with the slick sign lettering enamel.

You might go to a crafts store like Michaels or Joanne's and see if you can compare them side by side.
The best idea I can give you is that 80 is like belt leather wrapped around the wooden core while 40 is thicker crepe rubber like the sole of a hushpuppie shoe.
When I went looking for a roller the ones I found I also thought they were too hard and why I did not get one.

As for the rubber being too soft and paint going down over the edges of the letters the paint will do this on its own from what I had seen in posts.
BTW the posts are in the older truck area if you want to search for them.
Dave ----
Dave G.
81 F100 flare side 300 six / AA OD / NP435 / 2.75 gear
http://cars.grantskingdom1.com/index.php/1980-Ford-F100?page=1
81 F100 style side 300 six/SROD parts truck -RIP
http://cars.grantskingdom1.com/index.php/1981-Ford-F100
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Re: The Truck of Doom: An Occasional Build Thread

Dorsai
This post was updated on .
In reply to this post by Dorsai
Thanks to a busy day at work today I only had a little while to work on the truck, but I did get the heat barrier down:



I had originally planned to just put it on the passenger side over the catalytic converter, but then it occurred to me that I could put it on the driver side as well as an extra bit of sound dampening.  So now it's on both sides, held down with gaffer tape.

Also, all things come to those who wait:



I'm very pleased that it's an exact match in both pattern and color to what came with the truck.  It's got a couple of minor blemishes, but for something that's likely been sitting in a warehouse somewhere for decades it's pretty darn good.  Hopefully by the end of the week the seat will be at the upholstery shop.
Matthew
1980 F-150 Custom 2wd longbed, 300-6, C6, 2.75 rear axle
Atlanta GA
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Re: The Truck of Doom: An Occasional Build Thread

ArdWrknTrk
Administrator
Wow that's beautiful.
I hope your upholsterer does it justice.

Matthew, for someone who doesn't have time to work on their truck you are making a lot of progress.  

It is looking great!

 Jim,
Lil'Red is a '87 F250 HD, 4.10's, 1356 4x4, Zf-5, 3G, PMGR, Saginaw PS, desmogged with a Holley 80508 and Performer intake.
Too much other stuff to mention.
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Re: The Truck of Doom: An Occasional Build Thread

Dorsai
ArdWrknTrk wrote
Matthew, for someone who doesn't have time to work on their truck you are making a lot of progress.  

It is looking great!
Heh, thanks.  I really don't have a lot of time between work and school, but right now I have a burst of motivation so I'm making the most of it.  Besides, aside from the emergency repair back in January(?) when the squirrels ate the fuel line, it's been nearly two years since I've done much to the truck aside from drive it.  

If I'm going to make it to Gary's shindig in September, though, there's a lot more I want to do before hitting the road - new U-joints, transmission fluid change, rear diff oil change (it's possible that's still the factory oil in there), engine oil change, coolant change, carb cleaning/rebuild, new plugs/wires/cap/rotor, new speedo cable...and probably more I'm not remembering at the moment.  This thread may be busy the next few months.
Matthew
1980 F-150 Custom 2wd longbed, 300-6, C6, 2.75 rear axle
Atlanta GA
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Re: The Truck of Doom: An Occasional Build Thread

Gary Lewis
Administrator
I sure hope you get to make it this year.  And there's over three months to get the truck ready.  

That upholstery looks great.  I love using original fabrics.  
Gary, AKA "Gary fellow": Profile

Dad's: '81 F150 Ranger XLT 4x4: Down for restomod: Full-roller "stroked 351M" w/Trick Flow heads & intake, EEC-V SEFI/E4OD/3.50 gears w/Kevlar clutches
Blue: 2015 F150 Platinum 4x4 SuperCrew wearing Blue Jeans & sporting a 3.5L EB & Max Tow
Big Blue: 1985 F250HD 4x4: 460/ZF5/3.55's, D60 w/Ox locker in front & 10.25 Spicer/Trutrac in back, & EEC-V MAF/SEFI

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Re: The Truck of Doom: An Occasional Build Thread

Dorsai
Gary Lewis wrote
I sure hope you get to make it this year.  And there's over three months to get the truck ready.  
I do too...and I'm optimistic I will.  The show is near the beginning of my final semester in the program, and I only have one class to take.  Barring something truly weird going on with scheduling, I should be able to take a week off to come out.

That upholstery looks great.  I love using original fabrics.
It really does, I'm very happy with it.  I'm a fan of original materials as well, and in this case I really don't have a choice; much like the pinstriping, the truck would never look right to me with a plain red seat.  It would be one thing if the original material weren't available, then I'd get it redone with regular vinyl and put a saddle blanket over it.  But with the right material out there, well, I've got to go with it.
Matthew
1980 F-150 Custom 2wd longbed, 300-6, C6, 2.75 rear axle
Atlanta GA
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Re: The Truck of Doom: An Occasional Build Thread

Dorsai
As I mentioned over on the WHYDTYTT thread, I dropped my tired old seat off at the upholstery shop today, supposedly to be finished some time next week.  I'd like to be able to bolt it back in as soon as I get it home, so that means the clock is ticking on the rest of the interior work.

With the GTmat and heat barrier down previously, it's time to get the jute in:



That stuff is surprisingly difficult to wrangle into place; it doesn't want to stay put, hence all the tape.  Also, I didn't like how much thickness it added to the floor under the gas pedal; I know it will compress somewhat once the vinyl floor is down, but I don't know how much...and when you're sitting behind a 300, every millimeter of pedal travel counts.  So I cut away the jute beneath the pedal; if this is a really bad idea, feel free to let me know.

Once the jute was down, I decided to put the flooring in the cabin just to give it a chance to flatten out and conform before doing the proper install:



Or...maybe not.  That flooring has to be big enough to cover a supercab.  I know the instructions say not to lay it out in the sun, but that's what's going to have to happen if I'm ever going to get it properly positioned.  
Matthew
1980 F-150 Custom 2wd longbed, 300-6, C6, 2.75 rear axle
Atlanta GA
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